Leading Medical Misdiagnosis Malpractice Attorney Highlights Diagnosis Error Epidemic – Metairie, LA

Chip Wagar, a leading medical malpractice attorney in Metairie, Louisiana, has just revealed during a recent interview that it's likely that most Americans will experience a medical misdiagnosis in their lifetime. For more information please visit https://www.nolacounsel.com/

Metairie, LA, United States - February 13, 2018 /MM-REB/ —

In a recent interview, leading misdiagnosis malpractice attorney Chip Wagar highlighted the growing epidemic of diagnosis errors.

For more information please visit.. https://www.nolacounsel.com/

A 2014 study carried out by the Houston Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine revealed that 12 million Americans – or approximately 1 in 20 patients – are misdiagnosed every year.

When asked to comment, Mr Wagar said, “More worryingly, studies have shown that most Americans will be misdiagnosed in their lifetime. Unfortunately, this trend is not likely to subside soon and causes serious health and financial consequences.”

In 2016, experts from John Hopkins found that 250,000 deaths in the US were caused by an error in diagnosis, making it the third-largest cause of death.

The prevalence of medical misdiagnosis constitutes a serious safety risk to patients as it often has adverse health effects.

“Drugs given to treat a non-existent illness can wreak havoc on the body, leading to dangerous side effects or even death. Prescribed medicine as part of a treatment plan can also exacerbate the existing problems that have gone unnoticed,” Wagar said.

Mr Wagar added that a misdiagnosis and a course of treatment including surgery fail to address the underlying medical issue. This can lead to a delayed diagnosis of serious illnesses that could be treated earlier such as cancer, often causing irreparable physical and emotional harm.

Racking up medical bills is another major problem caused by diagnosis error.

“An error in diagnosing could lead to costly treatments or surgeries. As the patient doesn’t show improvement, these treatments are prolonged, leading to more medical bills and costs,” Wagar explained.

Identifying diagnosis errors, according to Wagar is the first step in recovering lost funds. Misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis can be defined as an incorrect identification of a someone’s medical condition by a health care professional, such as a doctor, resulting in loss or injury.

In the event of medical misdiagnosis, Wagar says, the best thing to do is to reach out to an experienced representative.

“An experienced malpractice attorney will know how to prove medical negligence, which will help you recover money lost on medical bills and possibly more for physical and emotional harm done,” Wagar said.

Source: http://RecommendedExperts.biz

Contact Info:
Name: Chip Wagar
Organization: Wagar Richard Kutcher Tygier & Luminais, LLP
Address: 3850 N Causeway Blvd Ste 900, Metairie, LA 70002, USA
Phone: 504-830-3838

For more information, please visit https://www.nolacounsel.com/

Source: MM-REB

Release ID: 296829

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